How Brain Chemistry May Lead to Compulsive Masturbation

As most men know, masturbation is an excellent way to relieve sexual tension, release daily stress or simply to have a good time with oneself. (It also can have a positive impact on penis health by keeping the organ well exercised.) Although many guys worry about their rate of masturbation, few are actually compulsive masturbators. And according to some studies, sometimes compulsive masturbation may be the result of using a medication known as pramipexole.

What is pramipexole?

Pramipexole is what is called a “non-ergot dopamine agonist.” What this basically means is that it is a compound which plays a role in regulating dopamine, which is associated with pleasure. Put in simplest terms, dopamine encourages people to lean toward behaviors that give them pleasure.

But pramipexole also has some valid uses in treating specific medical conditions. For example, it often is prescribed for Parkinson’s disease, as it can sometimes help to lessen the body function impairment associated with that disease. Many patients with restless leg syndrome receive benefit from it, and there have been studies as well in using the drug for bipolar disorder and depression.

Side effects

As with any drug, there are side effects associated with pramipexole. Some of them are relatively minor or usual, such as headaches or decreased appetite. Others are of more concern, such as hallucinations and fainting. Doctors have also noted that dopamine agonists like pramipexole are sometimes associated with compulsive behaviors, such as gambling.

One interesting case involved a man who was treated with pramipexole for restless leg syndrome for several years. The medication seemed to work well for this condition. However, his wife noticed that his sexual behaviors had changed since he began taking the medication. He now masturbated 6 to 8 times every day and seemed to have little control over it. He would often leave the table in the middle of meal in order to masturbate. (This happened not only when dining at home but also when in restaurants or when having dinner at another person’s house.) This had not been an issue previously.

Clearly, this was a case of an individual who did indeed fit the description of a compulsive masturbator. The doctor knew of the association between dopamine antagonists and compulsive behaviors and so suggested taking the patient off the drug. Within two weeks, his compulsive masturbation had stopped.

Not the only one

There have been other cases in which pramipexole has been associated with masturbation. For example, a journal published another case study in which a patient with Parkinson’s was prescribed the medication. He also reported developing a compulsion to masturbate several times a day. In addition, his partner reported that he had started masturbating even while he was asleep.

As with the previous case, the doctor discontinued use of pramipexole. Within a short period of time, the patient’s masturbatory frequency returned to normal (and the sleep masturbation did cease as well.)

It should be noted that many people use pramipexole (or other dopamine antagonists) without this side effect of compulsive masturbation. However, if a man is prescribed the drug and does find his masturbatory habits becoming compulsory, he should definitely confer with his doctor.

Even without pramipexole, however, a man’s masturbation routine may be such that he rubs himself a bit raw on occasion. Daily use of a superior penis health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) can help treat that rawness. For best results, the penis needs to be properly moisturized, and that means that the chosen crème should contain both a high end emollient (such as shea butter) and a natural hydrating agent (such as vitamin E). As a bonus, select a crème with vitamin A; this vitamin’s anti-bacterial property can help fight unwanted penis odor, a significant problem for many men.

Compulsive Shopping Addiction – Symptoms and Signs of Shopoholism

Compulsive shopping addiction can impact anyone at any time. Just like an addiction to drugs, alcohol, or gambling, shopping disorders are largely a result of an underlying chemical or mental imbalance that is triggered by certain events.

Much like the rush a gambler received after a big win, a compulsive shopper gets the same euphoric feeling when in the middle of a spending spree. Conversely, the impending let down and feeling of anxiety and depression after the even can be severe.

There are numerous signs and symptoms of a problem. While not any one symptom will define a problem, many times someone who shows signs of them indeed does have one. Here are some of the more common symptoms of shopping addiction:

1) Hiding of Purchases – Often, the person will hide the shopping purchases from others in hopes they will not discover the stash of goods they just bought. Of course, over time the hiding becomes more sophisticated and harder to keep from those close to them.

2) Excessive Credit Cards and Debt – Another common sign is running up credit cards and other debt to the point of making minimum payments becomes difficult to impossible. A person with a more severe case will open new accounts, often in just their name, to acquire the additional funds to continue binge shopping.

3) Stacks of New Items Never Used – A closet full of clothes or other items with tags still on them is a sign of excessive spending and compulsive shopping.

4) Depression or Anxiety After Shopping – Often, the person will enter an almost panic stricken state after a compulsive shopping binge.